Don’t tell me I can’t when I can

Sorry I have been away so long, sometimes life just gets in the way.

back to business.

So I was reading an article recently on HDR and it said you shouldn’t shoot moving objects for HDR especially like birds and animals. Which in principle I agree with and have even said so in my tutorials. But then I thought to myself, wait a minute, I just did just that. I shot birds in flight in an HDR.

 

So really while I wouldn’t want my whole scene to be moving object it really is quite possible IF you know how AND you have the great Photomatix Pro4.0

Here’s how.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see from my three images shot  at 0, -2 and +2 EV, The birds have moved quite a distance from image 1 to image 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So let’s fix that so we only have one set of clear, clean and sharp birds

Open your multiple exposures in Photomatix, In the first screen, as you usally come to, check the box for “Reduce Ghosting Artifacts”  and ” Semi-Manual Deghosting” Set the rest of the options as you normally would.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next up, This window will pop up and in it you can use your mouse and the target to select the area you want to de-ghost (click on images to enlarge for a better view of these screen shots)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, depending on the objects, you may be able to select the entire group as I did in this case, or you may have to go in and select each object individually for the best results. After you trace around your object, right click that area and say “Mark Selection as Ghosted Area”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can then click on “Preview Deghosting” and see if you have what you want, If not you can return to the selection process and reselect new areas or redo the areas you selected.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you make the selection, if you right click the selection again on previewing, you have the option of choosing different ones of your exposures to use as the non-ghosted area. In this case I choose the +2EV Image as the one I wanted for the Pelicans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you have what you want, click OK and go on to Tone Map your image as you usually would.

And there you have it, an HDR with objects in motion…Done

5 Comments

  1. Edith Levy June 29, 2011 at 8:37 pm #

    Perfect step by step. Thanks Peter.

  2. Patrick Monaghan June 30, 2011 at 11:31 am #

    Great image and excellent instructions as usual. Good to hear from you as well.

  3. Yechial Orgel June 30, 2011 at 9:34 pm #

    Wow, just what I would expect from you. Great Image, Precise Instructions. Beautiful!

  4. Charles May 12, 2012 at 8:40 am #

    Thanks! I have a question though. Instead of doing that, I read an article somewhere that you could just shoot a single image using raw format and you can edit the exposures of that single raw file to make 3 or infinitely more ‘jpegs’ with different exposures. The article says that you can then use that to make your ‘HDR’.

    I know this obviously will result in less quality, but is that still considered an HDR?
    PS. if you have time can you pls send me an email if you reply to this comment? (if it’s not already automatic) thank you very much! 😀

    • Peter May 12, 2012 at 9:09 am #

      Hi Charles,

      The answer is, Yes you can do this, but as you suspected the quality will be decreased for a couple of reasons.

      When you boost the shadow areas of the RAW file you will also increase the noise in that area significantly. This doesn’t happen when you shoot a image of the shadow area exposed brighter.
      Second, a RAW file can only recover so much in a overexposed highlight or “Blown-out” highlight. If the dynamic range is so high in your “Scene” before you that is not capturable in a single image. It may NOT be able to recover the detail lost in the highlight area.

      Can it be done? Absolutely. I’ve done it. It can work. But if you are going to do this you may also just want to try using the single image processing in Photomatix, or the HDR simulators in software Like Topaz Adjust 5. You may find you results even more pleasing. It something you need to experiment with yourself.

      As for “Is it HDR?”. Well that is the subject of much debate among many and in many photography forums. My opinion is , no it is not because you really haven’t captured any more dynamic range than the original image has, you are only tone mapping the information that is there. But then again, I have seen people shoot 3 or more images and still not really have an HDR ( Because the scene dynamic range was not beyond what was capturable in a single image)

      Great question though!
      Thanks
      PT

12 Trackbacks

  1. By Anatomy of a shot – Harbor Lights on July 13, 2011 at 10:58 pm

    […] My next step was to take the three image into Photomatix Pro 4.0 and use it’s powerful De-ghosting tool in the first menu ( See my tutorial on how to do that HERE) […]

  2. By When to up your ISO on September 12, 2011 at 8:58 am

    […] practice, don’t have moving objects in our HDRs, although, I did show you how to do that in this blog post. But sometimes we may not have obvious moving objects because to our eyes they […]

  3. By Ghost Adventures on September 12, 2011 at 9:29 am

    […] sure that Ghosts are NOT in the house (insert rapper emphasis). I’ve showed you in detail in This Post how to very effectively eliminate ghosting, even the most stubborn. Most HDR software also has some […]

  4. By Nik HDR Efex Pro – Review on September 20, 2011 at 11:29 pm

    […] Global setting and High. Those of you that remember the example I showed of De-Ghosting with the Pelicans in flight will be glad to know I used the same image and it came out very well with just a little bit of […]

  5. By Quick Tip: Cure the Blinky-Blackies on October 1, 2011 at 1:40 pm

    […] This is were we turn to what I think is one of the best features of good old Photomatix Pro 4.1  and some older versions (coupon code TheHDRImage)  The Selective Deghosting tool that I showed you how to use in this post […]

  6. […] of Photomatix Pro 4.1 that sets it apart from other software for Alighning and Deghosting. I have a seperate post on how to use this once you get udsed to doing the […]

  7. […] This is were we turn to what I think is one of the best features of good old Photomatix Pro 4.1  and some older versions (coupon code TheHDRImage)  The Selective Deghosting tool that I showed you how to use in this post […]

  8. […] Global setting and High. Those of you that remember the example I showed of De-Ghosting with the Pelicans in flight will be glad to know I used the same image and it came out very well with just a little bit of […]

  9. By Ghost Adventures | See N Learn Photography on April 5, 2012 at 9:26 pm

    […] sure that Ghosts are NOT in the house (insert rapper emphasis). I’ve showed you in detail in This Post how to very effectively eliminate ghosting, even the most stubborn. Most HDR software also has some […]

  10. […] practice, don’t have moving objects in our HDRs, although, I did show you how to do that in this blog post. But sometimes we may not have obvious moving objects because to our eyes they […]

  11. […]  My next step was to take the three image into Photomatix Pro 4.0 and use it’s powerful De-ghosting tool in the first menu ( See my tutorial on how to do that HERE) […]

  12. By Quick Tip: Cure the Blinky-Blackies on January 11, 2016 at 9:53 am

    […] This is were we turn to what I think is one of the best features of good old Photomatix Pro 4.1  and some older versions (coupon code TheHDRImage)  The Selective Deghosting tool that I showed you how to use in this post […]

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